WTT: Mind Your Space

Hey guys. I’m busy working on the remaining short stories for my short story collection. I’m currently stuck on one in particular; I’m working out the plot details right now. I’ll be starting a new day job in a couple weeks, so that’s pretty exciting. Means less time for personal writing, though! I’ve given myself the goal to complete my short story collection (not necessarily all the editing) by the end of the summer. Let’s see if I can do it. 😉

Well, today is Writing Tip Tuesday. Today, I want to talk about space. I’m sitting here in my homemade cozy library/study and I’m realizing that where you write is very important …

PhotoGrid_1462293769634b

Tip: Sure, as writers ideas can come to us anywhere–bars, parks, the mall, whatever–but it’s a good idea to have a designated spot where you do your serious writing and editing. A cozy armchair, a study, a corner of your local library. Just pick a place where you feel most comfortable and creative; this way you are not distracted by outside man-made and/or environmental factors.

Wr.Tu.Th.: The End?

This Writing Tutorial Thursday has been a long time coming. (My fault. Sorry.) Finally, we’ve reached….THE ENDING.

Writing Tutorial: The End?

Disclaimer: The information presented herein is based on what I, personally, have learned in my educational and professional careers. This tutorial is simply meant to offer some helpful tips.

INTRODUCTION: You’ve done it; you wrote your novel. You—wait a minute! What about the ending?

Admittedly, I have such a hard time with endings. And it’s one of the most important parts! It’s where you tie everything up; where your resolution happens; where everything comes together. So how do you write one? Here are some tips that have helped me in the ending-writing process.

1)As mentioned, the ending is where you resolve the central conflict. It’s also where you tie up loose ends. Make sure you’ve fixed the problems, solved the issues, etc. You shouldn’t leave your readers confused and wondering, “Wait, so what about….?”

2) Nothing new. The ending isn’t the time to introduce a new, surprise character or subplot. Unless these things were foreshadowed in early chapters, they shouldn’t be included. They just make things confusing.

3) Let your reader do the imagining. Try not to get carried away with descriptions of “what happens after.” You don’t have to write a neat and tidy ending; you can certainly let your reader figure it out.

4) Make sure your ending mirrors something in the beginning (or at least ties back to a crucial part of your story). Did your main character grow emotionally? Did he/she learn something since the beginning? Accomplish something? Do that one thing you wanted them to do? Be sure your reader can recognize that your ending somehow relates to an earlier theme or idea presented in your novel.

Hopefully these will help you craft some stellar endings. Do you have any other suggestions? Questions? Let me know!

Keep practicing and happy writing!

Wr.Tu.Th: Setting

We’re due for a new installment of Writing Tutorial Thursday. This week’s theme is setting.

Writing Tutorial: The Setting

Disclaimer: The information presented herein is based on what I, personally, have learned in my educational and professional careers. This tutorial is simply meant to offer some helpful tips.

INTRODUCTION: So you have an amazing plot and some really awesome characters. Where are you going to put them? Setting is especially important in works of fiction so that the reader has a proper stage in which to imagine your story play out. Now it’s time to figure out the where, when, what details of your novel’s backdrop. What are a few tips to remember when figuring out your story’s setting, though? Have no fear, I’m here to help!

1) One of the first things you may want to do is to imagine the world of your story. Brainstorm. Remember some fundamentals:

  • time (historical, time of day, year, etc.)
  • geography (natural and man-made)
  • climate and weather
  • specific location (country, state, neighborhood, etc.)

2) Show, don’t tell. When describing your setting to readers, don’t just say it was “a rainy Wednesday.” Say the monotonous pitter-patter on the windows added to the dreary weekday afternoon. Use imagery, metaphor, simile and other literary devices to add excitement to your writing.

3) Use your characters to present setting. A good way to bring the setting to your reader is through the eyes of your character. Make your reader feel the spring breeze, hear the truck down the street, and cough in the smoky, crowded cafe. Use your character’s five senses to describe the backdrop of a scene.

4) Use details that make sense to the plot. Your setting should tie into the plot. You wouldn’t want to write a story about a playground bully but have the setting be a circus. That just doesn’t make sense. Make sure the setting of each scene in your novel is there for a reason.

5) It’s all about balance. It’s important to remember not to overwhelm your chapters with pages of setting descriptions. Your setting is meant to be a backdrop, remember? It should only be there as a stage where the main performers act out the play. If you find yourself writing paragraphs about a room, sit back and think about what’s most important about the room. Sure it’s an old room, but maybe it’s the creepy painting over the fireplace. Focus on that.

Do you have any other suggestions? Questions? Let me know. As always, the way to better writing is by practicing!

Until next time. Happy writing!

WTT: Blocked?

It’s Writing Tip Tuesday (and I almost forgot it was Tuesday!). Let’s talk about writer’s block.

Writer’s block isn’t any fun. When it happens to a writer, they’ll tell you it feels like they can’t put anything on paper at all. But that’s the precise moment you must! Even if it’s just a few sentences, you must write. Keeping those creative channels open is very important. Keep that pen moving!